Purpose

To identify the rate of re-revision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction(ACLR) to estimate the influence of patient-related factors on the risk of re-revision ACLR. The secondary aim of the study was to report the intra-articular findings and patient-related factors at the time of revision ACLR and to compare these with the findings in a matched controlled group of primary ACLR.

Methods

Patients with primary ACLR without a subsequent need of revision and patients with a revision ACLR identified in the Norwegian Knee LigamentRegistry from June 2004 through September 2016 were included. Using age at operation, sex, activity at injury, and year of ACLR as covariates, a propensity score matched control group of primary ACLR patients for the revision ACLR patients was identified. For the revision ACLR patients, re-revision ACLR rates at 1, 2, 5, and 8 years were estimated with Kaplan-Meier analysis; the hazard ratio for a re-revision ACLR was estimated using a multivariable Cox regression model.

Results

The cumulative estimated proportion of patients undergoing a re-revision ACLR at 1, 2, 5, and 8 years after the original revision ACLR was 0.4%, 3.0%, 6.5%, and 9.0% respectively. There was no significant difference between the control and revision ACLR groups regarding cartilage injury (P = .72) or associated ligament injury (P = .17). Revision ACLR patients did have fewer meniscal injuries (P < .001). There were no intraoperative findings or surgical techniques identified as a predictor for a higher risk of re-revision ACLR.

Conclusions

Based on a review of a large ligament reconstruction registry,one can expect 9% of patients to undergo a re-revision ALCR at 8 years of follow up. Revision ACLR did not have an increase in cartilage injuries or associated ligament injuries and had significantly fewer meniscal injuries compared with a primary ACLR control group.

Full Article: Re-revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: An Evaluation From the Norwegian Knee Ligament Registry

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